Writer Camryn Crump Creates a Safe Space for Youth

Camryn Crump

By Ashley Chambers Telling stories has always been a part of Camryn Crump’s journalistic makeup. His articles have appeared on the pages of Post newspapers, stories on an HIV event at Yoshi’s, gospel entertainer Charlene Moore, and most recently, “Still Sounding the Alarm on African American AIDS State of Emergency.” The youngest of three boys, Crump, 25, was raised in the church. His late grandfather, Wiclisse Lewin, founded the Upper Room Apostolic Church in Sacramento, and his parents are Evangelist Marjorie Crump and Minister Marvin Crump. Camryn says his grandfather, who passed away this past June, was his hero. “The way he carried himself, the way he dressed, the way he spoke; He was very wise, and he would makesure that people heard his heart and not his words,” he said. When it comes to issues of social justice and crises affecting the African American community, the writer, who has West Indian roots, wants to use his words to raise awareness. “My goal is to stay on top of interesting topics that affect the community in general, making people aware of the things happening around them that they are not informed about,” he said. Post writer Jesse Brooks has been a mentor to Crump, guiding him through the process. Studying Mass Media Communications at the Academy of Art University, Crump wants to create a safe space for young people Camryn says his grandfather, who passed away this past June, was his hero. “The way he carried himself, the way he dressed, the way he spoke; He was very wise, and he would make to express themselves. “I’ve learned to be a safe space for youth and young adults to express themselves freely,” he said. “I want to convey to the youth (that) it’s so much easier for people to believe you when you are yourself, when you don’t care about what other people think about you, when you’re honest about who you are.” In describing his style and sense of self, Crump said, “A lot of people think I’m very serious and stern, but I’m so goofy that if I were sound, I would be really loud; and if I were a type of pattern, I would be polka dots. I’m very colorful, I don’t believe in matching, I like to throw things together with my glasses; [I just] be myself.”

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