Father Jay Matthews, Pastor St. Benedict Church Sees Succession to Pope Benedict

Oakland’s Father Jay Matthews (third from left in second row)is shown here in a picture taken inside St. Peter’s Basilica on Demember 25, 1999 on the occassion of the opening of the Holy Door at the beginning of the Great Jubilee of 2000.

Pope Benedict

By Father Jay Matthews Pope Benedict XVI, in his own words, declared on Monday, Feb.11, “Well aware of the seriousness of this and with full freedom I declare that I renounce the ministry of Bishop of Rome, Successor of St. Peter… As from Feb. 8, 2013, at 11 a.m. (PST) the See of Rome, the See of St. Peter will be vacant and a conclave to elect the new Supreme Pontiff will have to be convoked by thosewhose competence it is.” Pope Benedict’s public reason for resigning is that he no longer has the mental and physical strength to run the Roman Catholic Church. A pope has not resigned from the papacy since Pope Gregory XII in the year 1415. A new pope of the world’s 1.2 billion Roman Catholics could be elected as soon as the middle of March. The process of electing a new pope has already begun after Benedict XVI’s announcement.The Secretary of State of the Vatican Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone is also the Chamberlain of the Church who oversees the Vatican and the papal election until a new pope is elected. He will convene a council to contact all the cardinals of the world who are under the age of 80 (about 120) who will elect among themselves the new pope.Although church law states that any Catholic male who is baptized and confirmed is eligible to be elected pope, by tradition it has been cardinals who are elected as pope. What becomes of Pope Benedict XVI? What we know now is that he will live quietly in a newly remodeled cloistered convent inside the walls of Vatican City that will accommodate himself, his secretary, a housekeeper and a cook. He most likely will not appear in public ever again and receive very few visitors.His new life will probably consist of writing, reflection and prayer. He will turn 86 in April and looks forward to needed rest that will lead to peace of mind and heart.By Father Jay Matthews Pope Benedict XVI, in his own words, declared on Monday, Feb.11, “Well aware of the seriousness of this and with full freedom I declare that I renounce the ministry of Bishop of Rome, Successor of St. Peter… As from Feb. 28, 2013, at 11 a.m. (PST) the See of Rome, the See of St. Peter will be vacant and a conclave to elect the new Supreme Pontiff will have to be convoked by those whose competence it is.”Pope Benedict’s public reason for resigning is that he no longer has the mental and physical strength to run the Roman Catholic Church. A pope has not resigned from the papacy since Pope Gregory XII in the year 1415.A new pope of the world’s 1.2 billion Roman Catholics could be elected as soon as the middle of March. The process of electing a new pope has already begun after Benedict XVI’s announcement.  The Secretary of State of the Vatican Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone is also the Chamberlain of the Church who oversees the Vatican and the papal election until a new pope is elected. He will convene a council to contact all the cardinals of the world who are under the age of 80 (about 120) who will elect among themselves the new pope.Although church law states that any Catholic male who is baptized and confirmed is eligible to be elected pope, by tradition it has been cardinals who are elected as pope. What becomes of Pope Benedict XVI? What we know now is that he will live quietly in a newly remodeled cloistered convent inside the walls of Vatican City that will accommodate himself, his secretary, a housekeeper and a cook. He most likely will not appear in public ever again and receive very few visitors.  His new life will probably consist of writing, reflection and prayer. He will turn 86 in April and looks forward to needed rest that will lead to peace of mind and heart.  
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