Former Bay Area Resident Raymond Bell Wins Second Emmy

Photo by Gloria Zuurveen
(L-R) Darrell and Susan Carr and Raymond Bell, Emmy Winner for “The Justin Carr Story” at the Brownstone Bistro.

Photo by Gloria Zuurveen (L-R) Darrell and Susan Carr and Raymond Bell, Emmy Winner for “The Justin Carr Story” at the Brownstone Bistro.

Producer Raymond Bell, a Berkeley High School graduate in the 1970s, recently received television’s highest honor, winning an Emmy at the 66th Los Angeles Area Emmy Awards, hosted by the Television Academy.

This is the second Emmy for Mr. Bell, who won his first Emmy in 2010 for Best Sports Reporting for KTTV Fox Channel 11.

Bell won the Emmy award on July 26 or producing a story on Justin Carr, a 16-year-old honor student and athlete who died tragically during swimming practice. Bell won in the category “Best Light News Single Reporting.”

Bell graduated from U.C.L.A in 1978 in Fine Arts with a degree in Motion Picture Television while enjoying an outstanding career as a football player for the Bruins.

He broke into the television industry in 1982 as a sports intern at KTLA Channel 5 and eventually went from production assistant to one of the stations sports producers. In 1991 he covered one of the largest stories in sports history when former Lakers Magic Johnson revealed to the world he was HIV positive.

Subsequently, Bell became a sports producer at KTTV Fox Channel 11 where he became Field Producer of live sporting events coordinating live pre-game and post-game interviews for the Clippers, Dodgers, Lakers, Angels, Kings, Ducks, UCLA and USC.

Bell met Justin Carr while filming a documentary on the famous “El Capitan” theater, a Hollywood Landmark in 2012. Then 15 years old, Carr caught Bell’s attention because the young man was on an architectural tour that mostly attracted adults.

The young man told Bell he was interested in studying architecture and had asked that his mom bring him. During the conversation Bell discovered that Carr was the grandson of Burl Abron Toler, who was the first African-American football official in the National Football League.

Bell told Carr and his mother that he would like to do a documentary on Burl Toler and they exchanged numbers. Bell and Doug Harris went to the family home to interview Carr’s mother regarding Toler’s career.

Carr was a high achieving student, artist, athlete and advocate for world peace who attended Harvard Westlake School in Studio City. He died during a swimming workout from Hypertrophic Cadiomyopathy, which is one of the most common causes of cardiac arrest in young people, especially athletes.

“This was an amazing young man destined for greatness,” said Bell. “At age four he starte a campaign for world peace. Now many, with his mother and father in the lead, are moving forward with his dream to honor his name.”

For more information on Justin Carr go to: www.justincarrwantsworldpeace.org

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