COMMENTARY: The Polarity of a Black Man in the White House With Poverty and Turmoil in the Streets

President Obama speaking at a ceremony commemorating the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. Behind him is a bell that once rang at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., which was bombed days after the March On Washington, killing four young girls.  Photo courtesy of the LA Times. (Evan Vucci at AP).

President Obama speaking at a ceremony commemorating the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. Behind him is a bell that once rang at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., which was bombed days after the March On Washington, killing four young girls. Photo courtesy of the LA Times. (Evan Vucci at AP).

As a black Republican I have so much I want to share; debate; explore and examine with you. Our weekly conversations will go all the way from the genesis of the Republican Party up to and including the current news of the day from the riots in Missouri to the ever growing presence of blacks on Wall Street and at the head of corporate America.

 

When Charles Dickens coined the phrase “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times” in the 1800’s he could have easily been describing this day in 2014. The state of black America is experiencing this very polarity, with a black man in the White House and riots in the streets, with the incredible wealth of those such as Oprah Winfrey to the depths of poverty of black America.

Per the most recent State of Working America report, among racial and ethnic groups blacks had the highest poverty rate at 27.4 percent, with 45.8 percent of young black children (under age 6) in poverty. The thread of politics has been prominently interwoven into the very fabric of Black America.

Like no other demographic, we have survived the slave trade, we fought in the Civil War, we earned our emancipation, we were subjected to Jim Crow laws, we sought relief from desegregated education through the Brown vs. Board of Education

decision from the Supreme Court and we exercised our right to vote to help elect and re-elect America’s first Black President Barack Obama.

In light of these amazing historical contributions, many of my columns and weekly conversations will revolve around race and politics. Understandably, some of my thoughts might spark disagreements, but I also deeply feel that we will find that we agree on far more topics than we disagree.

KarenWatsonKaren Watson is author of the book, “Being Black and Republican in the Age of Obama”

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3 Comments

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  2. Cony

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  3. Michael Neibel

    “but I also deeply feel that we will find that we agree on far more topics than we disagree.”

    I couldn’t agree more. See my essay “Advice to Republicans on my part time blog http://www.mikeseyes.blogspot.com

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