De Anza HS Senior Named Gates Millennium Scholar

0
1159

For the third year in a row, a De Anza High School senior has been named a Gates Millennium Scholar, earning recognition as one of the nation’s top high school seniors, the United Negro College Fund announced last week.

Jessica Gill, 17, has been accepted to UC Berkeley and is one of 1,000 seniors from across the country to win the scholarship. The scholarship will cover Gill’s unmet financial need and, through the program, provide services to encourage academic excellence; mentoring services for academic and personal development; and an online resource center that provides internship, fellowship and scholarship information.

“Being named a Gates Millennium Scholar is a testament to Jessica’s hard work and determination to succeed academically,” Board of Education President Todd Groves said. “We are proud of her for achieving this honor. That a student from our district has earned this honor for four of the last five years speaks to the possibilities and potential of each and every one of our students.”

Gill plans to study integrative biology at Cal before she attends medical school. Her chosen career path is to become a pediatrician. “I’ve wanted to be a doctor since I was young, and I love working with kids,” she said.

At De Anza, she is a member of the Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement club and a vice president of the Health Occupations Students of America chapter. Gill also volunteers at the local Sikh temple where she helps feed people and teaches classes for students who want to learn Sikh history.

In school, she is currently taking five Advanced Placement courses and holds a 4.3 grade point average.

There was one piece of advice Gill wanted to pass on to her fellow students: “In order to be successful, dedication is key.”

This is the third consecutive year and fourth time in five years that a district student has won the prestigious award. Last year, De Anza student Cali Nguyen was named a Gates Millennium Scholar. In 2013, John F. Kennedy High School senior Kelssie Sontay Perez won the scholarship, and in 2011, Jennifer Ezeokoli and Benjamin Ezeokoli from Middle College High School received the recognition.

Established in 1999 with the goal of developing Leaders for America’s Future, the program is funded by a $1.6 billion grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The program removes the financial barriers to education for high-performing, low-income students.

Each year it enables 5,000 students to attend and graduate from 800 of the most selective private and public schools in the country, including Ivy League colleges, flagship state universities, UNCF member institutions and other minority-serving institutions.

For the third year in a row, a De Anza High School senior has been named a Gates Millennium Scholar, earning recognition as one of the nation’s top high school seniors, the United Negro College Fund announced last week.

Jessica Gill, 17, has been accepted to UC Berkeley and is one of 1,000 seniors from across the country to win the scholarship. The scholarship will cover Gill’s unmet financial need and, through the program, provide services to encourage academic excellence; mentoring services for academic and personal development; and an online resource center that provides internship, fellowship and scholarship information.

“Being named a Gates Millennium Scholar is a testament to Jessica’s hard work and determination to succeed academically,” Board of Education President Todd Groves said. “We are proud of her for achieving this honor. That a student from our district has earned this honor for four of the last five years speaks to the possibilities and potential of each and every one of our students.”

Gill plans to study integrative biology at Cal before she attends medical school. Her chosen career path is to become a pediatrician. “I’ve wanted to be a doctor since I was young, and I love working with kids,” she said.

At De Anza, she is a member of the Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement club and a vice president of the Health Occupations Students of America chapter. Gill also volunteers at the local Sikh temple where she helps feed people and teaches classes for students who want to learn Sikh history.

In school, she is currently taking five Advanced Placement courses and holds a 4.3 grade point average.

There was one piece of advice Gill wanted to pass on to her fellow students: “In order to be successful, dedication is key.”

This is the third consecutive year and fourth time in five years that a district student has won the prestigious award. Last year, De Anza student Cali Nguyen was named a Gates Millennium Scholar. In 2013, John F. Kennedy High School senior Kelssie Sontay Perez won the scholarship, and in 2011, Jennifer Ezeokoli and Benjamin Ezeokoli from Middle College High School received the recognition.

Established in 1999 with the goal of developing Leaders for America’s Future, the program is funded by a $1.6 billion grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The program removes the financial barriers to education for high-performing, low-income students.

Each year it enables 5,000 students to attend and graduate from 800 of the most selective private and public schools in the country, including Ivy League colleges, flagship state universities, UNCF member institutions and other minority-serving institutions.

For the third year in a row, a De Anza High School senior has been named a Gates Millennium Scholar, earning recognition as one of the nation’s top high school seniors, the United Negro College Fund announced last week.

Jessica Gill, 17, has been accepted to UC Berkeley and is one of 1,000 seniors from across the country to win the scholarship. The scholarship will cover Gill’s unmet financial need and, through the program, provide services to encourage academic excellence; mentoring services for academic and personal development; and an online resource center that provides internship, fellowship and scholarship information.

“Being named a Gates Millennium Scholar is a testament to Jessica’s hard work and determination to succeed academically,” Board of Education President Todd Groves said. “We are proud of her for achieving this honor. That a student from our district has earned this honor for four of the last five years speaks to the possibilities and potential of each and every one of our students.”

Gill plans to study integrative biology at Cal before she attends medical school. Her chosen career path is to become a pediatrician. “I’ve wanted to be a doctor since I was young, and I love working with kids,” she said.

At De Anza, she is a member of the Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement club and a vice president of the Health Occupations Students of America chapter. Gill also volunteers at the local Sikh temple where she helps feed people and teaches classes for students who want to learn Sikh history.

In school, she is currently taking five Advanced Placement courses and holds a 4.3 grade point average.

There was one piece of advice Gill wanted to pass on to her fellow students: “In order to be successful, dedication is key.”

This is the third consecutive year and fourth time in five years that a district student has won the prestigious award. Last year, De Anza student Cali Nguyen was named a Gates Millennium Scholar. In 2013, John F. Kennedy High School senior Kelssie Sontay Perez won the scholarship, and in 2011, Jennifer Ezeokoli and Benjamin Ezeokoli from Middle College High School received the recognition.

Established in 1999 with the goal of developing Leaders for America’s Future, the program is funded by a $1.6 billion grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The program removes the financial barriers to education for high-performing, low-income students.

Each year it enables 5,000 students to attend and graduate from 800 of the most selective private and public schools in the country, including Ivy League colleges, flagship state universities, UNCF member institutions and other minority-serving institutions.

For the third year in a row, a De Anza High School senior has been named a Gates Millennium Scholar, earning recognition as one of the nation’s top high school seniors, the United Negro College Fund announced last week.

Jessica Gill, 17, has been accepted to UC Berkeley and is one of 1,000 seniors from across the country to win the scholarship. The scholarship will cover Gill’s unmet financial need and, through the program, provide services to encourage academic excellence; mentoring services for academic and personal development; and an online resource center that provides internship, fellowship and scholarship information.

“Being named a Gates Millennium Scholar is a testament to Jessica’s hard work and determination to succeed academically,” Board of Education President Todd Groves said. “We are proud of her for achieving this honor. That a student from our district has earned this honor for four of the last five years speaks to the possibilities and potential of each and every one of our students.”

Gill plans to study integrative biology at Cal before she attends medical school. Her chosen career path is to become a pediatrician. “I’ve wanted to be a doctor since I was young, and I love working with kids,” she said.

At De Anza, she is a member of the Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement club and a vice president of the Health Occupations Students of America chapter. Gill also volunteers at the local Sikh temple where she helps feed people and teaches classes for students who want to learn Sikh history.

In school, she is currently taking five Advanced Placement courses and holds a 4.3 grade point average.

There was one piece of advice Gill wanted to pass on to her fellow students: “In order to be successful, dedication is key.”

This is the third consecutive year and fourth time in five years that a district student has won the prestigious award. Last year, De Anza student Cali Nguyen was named a Gates Millennium Scholar. In 2013, John F. Kennedy High School senior Kelssie Sontay Perez won the scholarship, and in 2011, Jennifer Ezeokoli and Benjamin Ezeokoli from Middle College High School received the recognition.

Established in 1999 with the goal of developing Leaders for America’s Future, the program is funded by a $1.6 billion grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The program removes the financial barriers to education for high-performing, low-income students.

Each year it enables 5,000 students to attend and graduate from 800 of the most selective private and public schools in the country, including Ivy League colleges, flagship state universities, UNCF member institutions and other minority-serving institutions.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here