Judge Strikes Down ACA Putting Law in Legal Peril — Again

0
1000
Isabel Diaz Tinoco and Jose Luis Tinoco shop for an insurance plan under the Affordable Care Act in 201. On Friday, a federal judge in Texas struck down the health law as unconstitutional. Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

Isabel Diaz Tinoco and Jose Luis Tinoco shop for an insurance plan under the Affordable Care Act in 201. On Friday, a federal judge in Texas struck down the health law as unconstitutional. Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

The future of the Affordable Care Act is threatened — again — this time by a ruling Decem¬ber 14 from a federal district court judge in Texas.
Judge Reed C. O’Connor struck down the law, siding with a group of 18 Republican state attorneys general and two GOP governors who brought the case. O’Connor said the tax bill passed by Congress last December effectively rendered the entire health law unconstitutional.
That tax measure eliminated the penalty for not having insur¬ance. An earlier Supreme Court decision upheld the ACA based on the view that the penalty was a tax and thus the law was valid because it relied on appropriate power allowed Congress under the Constitution. O’Connor’s decision said that without that penalty, the law no longer met that constitutional test.
“In some ways, the question before the Court involves the intent of both the 2010 and 2017 Congresses,” O’Connor wrote in his 55-page decision. “The former enacted the ACA. The latter sawed off the last leg it stood on.”
The decision came just hours before the end of open enrollment for ACA plans in most states that use the federal healthcare.gov insurance exchange. It is not expected that the ruling will impact the coverage for those people — the final decision will likely not come until the case reaches the Supreme Court again.
Seema Verma, the administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, which oversees those insurance exchanges, said in a tweet: “The recent federal court decision is still moving through the courts, and the exchanges are still open for business and we will continue with open enrollment. There is no impact to current coverage or coverage in a 2019 plan.”
The 16 Democratic state attorneys general who intervened in the case to defend the health law immediately vowed to appeal.
“The ACA has already survived more than 70 unsuccessful repeal attempts and withstood scrutiny in the Supreme Court,” said a statement from California Attorney General Xavier Becerra. “Today’s misguided ruling will not deter us: our coalition will continue to fight in court for the health and wellbeing of all Americans.”
It is all but certain the case will become the third time the Supreme Court decides a constitutional question related to the ACA. In addition to upholding the law in 2012, the court rejected another challenge to the law in 2015.
It is hard to overstate what would happen to the nation’s health care system if the decision is ultimately upheld. The Affordable Care Act touched almost every aspect of health care, from Medicare and Med¬icaid to generic biologic drugs, the Indian Health Service, and public health changes like calorie counts on menus.
The case, Texas v. United States, was filed in February. The plaintiffs argued that because the Supreme Court upheld the ACA in 2012 as a constitutional use of its taxing power, the elimination of the tax makes the rest of the law unconstitutional.
In June, the Justice Department announced it would not fully defend the law in court. While the Trump administration said it did not agree with the plaintiffs that the tax law meant the entire ACA was unconstitutional, it said that the provisions of the law guaranteeing that people with preexisting health conditions could purchase coverage at the same price as everyone else were so inextricably linked to the tax penalty that they should be struck.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here